disability

Gender and Enterprise Newsletter

Posted on Updated on

Please see below for a number of interesting recent announcements and relevant research publications (click headings for downloads or more information).

Places still available at Developing Women’s Leadership: Theory and Practice 25-26 May University of Roehampton

  • a 1.5 day workshop driven by the need to address the lack of individual and organisational theories that focus on women’s leadership. This gap in the literature means we are unable to address important leadership theories confidently, yet the demand for insights about women and leadership continues to increase.

Opportunity for women-owned businesses to meet with Women Entrepreneurs Netherlands

1) Wednesday 13th April
Networking and Matchmaking, Dutch Embassy, 38 Hyde Park Gate, London, SW7 5DP

2) Thursday 14th April –  3.30pm
High Tea & Networking, The House of Lords, Parliament Square, London, SW1A 0PW
This event is hosted by Baroness Howells of St Davids, Member of the House of Lords.

If you would like to attend, please email your contact details to events@womennetherlands.com.

Disability and Entrepreneurship Workshop 21 April 2016

  • The Enterprise and Diversity Research Cluster at Birmingham Business School is holding this ‘Disability and Entrepreneurship’ workshop to highlight this intersection of two vexed concepts as a place where ideas from disability studies and the business school can meet and interact in a way that has theoretical, as well as practical socio-economic, implications. This event will combine ongoing work from established and new scholars in this area, drawing upon a range of empirical and theoretical material. Whilst it will be of particular interest to those with an interest in disability and enterprise, it will also be informative to those with other interests in the business school, and disability studies more broadly.

Publication of GARCIA working papers 

  • Gender equality and gender dimension in research are now priorities of the European Union Horizon2020 Framework Programme. The GARCIA project shares the same views, in considering how the gender dimension affects excellence and efficiency in research.The project plans to map and analyze the gender dimension at different organizational levels in various European research institutions. With a specific focus on the early stages of academic and scientific careers, the aim is to implement specific actions for combating gender stereotypes and discriminations.

CfP HISTORICAL APPROACHES TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP RESEARCH: Investigating Context, Time, and Change in Entrepreneurial Processes

  • For this special issue, we seek theoretical and empirical work that significantly advances our understanding of whether and how historical research and reasoning can contribute to our understanding of entrepreneurship. In this regard, we encourage submissions that not only make contributions to entrepreneurship research and theory, but also engage the methodological and theoretical issues involved in using historical approaches in the management disciplines.

Here to Stay: Women’s Self-Employment in a (post) austerity era – Report by UK Women’s Budget Group

  • Since the financial crisis and economic recession, the UK labour market has undergone a series of structural shifts. These have seen levels of female economic inactivity drop to a historic low, but also ushered in a new era of precarious working with self-employment accounting for a significant proportion of post-recession economic activity, especially for women. This paper explores these trends, and what they mean for the women directly affected as well as for policy setting.

Women and low income households again paying for the Chancellor’s tax cuts

  • Only three days after research by the Women’s Budget Group showed that those on the lowest incomes – the majority of whom are women – would lose five times as much as the richest households,[1] the Chancellor has again delivered a budget that sees women and disabled people paying for his tax cuts.

GenPort Resources List

  • Including She Figures 2015 report: fifth edition of the She Figures series –released every three years since 2003– which aims to monitor the level of progress made towards gender equality in research and innovation in the European Union. It analyzes comparable statistics on women and men amongst PhD graduates, researchers and decision-makers, and data on differences in working.

 

Grants for Feminist Projects Available in UK and Internationally

Posted on Updated on

The Feminist Review Trust are offering grants for projects in the UK and internationally that transform the lives of women.

Current Status

Open for Applications

Maximum Value

£ 15,000

Objectives of Fund

The Trust aims to support projects in the UK and internationally that transform the lives of women.

Value Notes

Grants of up to £15,000 are available. However, the Trustees rarely give out awards of this amount.

Match Funding Restrictions

Applicants should bear in mind that they may only be offered partial funding.

Who Can Apply

Individuals and organisations in the UK and internationally are eligible to apply.

Restrictions

Funding is not available for the following:

  • Applications from students to support them on courses of any kind, this includes sub-degree, Bachelors, Masters and Doctorates. Nor will funding be available for doctoral fieldwork. Exceptionally contributions of up to £500 may be made to assist a student from a poor country.
  • Applications from academics to fund work which could be funded by more traditional sources of funding. This means that summer projects for US academics are very unlikely to receive funding.
  • Where academics do receive funding, this will not cover overheads, teaching buy-outs or equivalent.
  • Applications to continue doctoral studies. Post-docs can be funded from more conventional sources.
  • Religious groups.

The Trust rarely funds stand-alone research.

Eligible Expenditure

Funding is for projects that relate to the Trust’s objectives, which are:

  • To advance the education of the public in the subject of gender.
  • To promote equality of opportunity between women and men in any part of the world.
  • To alleviate poverty and hardship by promoting and advancing good health and education among women in any part of the world.
  • To undertake other charitable purposes.

The Trust will fund the following:

  • Hard to fund projects. Some types of projects are difficult to fund. Typically these projects have no other obvious sources of funding. This might mean, for example, that traditional academic sources are either not interested in the area or that it is an activist project or that it is too feminist for most conventional funding sources. For example the Trust supported the writing and publication of the history of Rape Crisis in Scotland and the translation and updating sections of ‘Women and Their Bodies’ into Arabic and Hebrew.
  • Pump priming activities. This means that the Trust will provide a small amount of funding to help start an activity in the hope that it will then be able attract sufficient funding to continue. For example the Trust funded a project in Argentina to strengthen the capacity of organisations promoting women’s rights and a project to provide audio visual equipment for a feminist social centre in Madrid. In each case these projects have hopefully helped to create a sustainable activity.
  • Interventionist projects which support feminist values. It is often difficult for projects around core feminist concerns such as abortion rights and domestic violence to find funding. The Trust has supported, for example, Asylum Aid (an independent charity workshop with asylum seekers in the UK) to promote its ‘Charter of Rights’ for Women Seeking Asylum. The Trust has also supported the 40th Anniversary Campaign of Abortion Rights in the UK, a documentary about abortion in Trinidad and Tobago and a feminist art studio in Tbilisi, Georgia.
  • Training and development projects: funding for projects which provide training in relevant areas. For example, the Trust has funded English lessons for sex workers in London; leadership skills training for women in the voluntary sector and volunteer training at Glasgow Women’s Library.
  • One off events: the Trust supported Cine25 as part of the celebrations of 25 years of Women’s Studies at the University of York (UK); a seminar for the Lileth Project (a violence against women housing related project), and a workshop on the gender dimensions of Bulgarian Immigration Policy.
  • Dissemination: the Trust will fund the production and distribution of relevant material. Too often work has had a more limited impact than it should because it was not well distributed. For example the Trust has supported the production of a booklet on Asian women’s experiences of higher education in the UK and the distribution of publications by the Rights of Women (a non-profit UK group).
  • Core funding: the Trust realises that many groups struggle to raise core funding. The Trustees are willing to offer core funding to cover staff costs, accommodation etc.
  • Other projects: the Trust may still support an application that does not easily fit into any of the above categories. For example, the Trust has funded a project to capture oral histories of women’s experience of the menopause. Applicants should contact the Trust to discuss eligibility prior to submitting an application.

In 2015, international applications will be particularly welcome in the following areas:

  • Violence against women.
  • Disabled women and girls.
  • Women, sustainability and climate change.

Where projects include a research element, applicants should describe the steps that have been taken to ensure the research will be undertaken in an ethical manner and careful attention should be paid to the costs.

How To Apply

Deadline(s):

2015 deadlines: 31 January 2015; 31 May 2015; and 30 September 2015.

Frequency: Periodic.

Link to guidelines:

http://www.feminist-review-trust.com/