organisation

ESRC Gendered Inclusion in Organisations

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Dear colleagues

Registration is now open for the final event in our ESRC Gendered Inclusion in Organisations series which will be held at Middlesex University London.

Day 1: 31st of May 2018: Gendered Inclusion in ‘traditional’ and ‘creative’ sector organisations and industries will look at the patterns of women’s inclusion in traditional, male-dominated industries to see if there has been much change, and also examine gendered work in ‘creative sectors’ which are considered to be more ‘female-friendly’. Speakers will discuss the issues related to gendered inclusion in finance, construction, aviation, music, film industry and journalism, illuminating how and on what conditions women are included, and how inclusion rhetoric continues to be intertwined with and often obscures continuous and new types of gender exclusion.

Speakers include:

  • Karen Lee Ashcraft (Professor of Organisational Communication at the University of Colorado Boulder)
  • Melissa Fisher (Lauritis Andersen Professor at the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Copenhagen)
  • Tessa Wright (Reader at the School of Business and Management at Queen Mary University of London)
  • Christina Scharff (Senior Lecturer at the Department of Culture, Media and Creative Industries at King’s College London)
  • Natalie Wreyford (Research Fellow on ‘Calling the Short’ project, Faculty of Humanities at the University of Southampton)
  • Yasmin Alibhai-Brown (A renowned British journalist and author, and a Professor at Middlesex University)

Day 2: 1st of June 2018: Drawing conclusions and setting research agenda for Critical Inclusion Studies, will explore the ‘fall out’ of the current situation of limited inclusion looking at the rise of neoliberal feminist rhetoric, its impact, the differences between the rhetoric and women’s experiences, as well as problematize the lack of ‘inclusivity’ within the very discipline of diversity studies. We will then have a follow up round-table discussion in order to consolidate insights from previous seminars and map out future research directions for Critical Inclusion Studies.

Speakers include:

  • Florence Villesèche (Assistant Professor and Marie Curie Fellow at Copenhagen Business School)
  • Catherine Rottenberg (Senior Lecturer at the Department of Foreign Literatures and Linguistics at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and currently a Marie Currie Fellow at the Department of Sociology, Goldsmith University of London)
  • Shani Orgad (Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communications at the London School of Economic)
  • Pasi Ahonen (Lecturer in Organisation Studies at the University of Essex Business School)

Attendance is FREE. Please note that the registration is free for each day To register for DAY 1 please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/gendered-inclusion-in-traditional-and-creative-sector-organisations-and-industries-tickets-45290343637

To register for DAY 2 please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/gendered-inclusion-in-organisations-drawing-conclusions-and-setting-research-agenda-for-critical-tickets-45291066800

Bursaries: To encourage the participation of early career scholars and PhD students, we have a number of TRAVEL BURSARIES. To apply for a bursary please email Dr Maria Adamson m.adamson@mdx.ac.uk providing a brief account of your circumstances and why you are interested in attending the seminar. Bursaries are allocated on the first-come-first-served basis.

Organisers: The seminar series is organised by Dr Maria Adamson (Middlesex), Professor Elisabeth Kelan (Cranfield), Dr Patricia Lewis (Kent), Professor Nick Rumens (Middlesex), Professor Martyna Śliwa (Essex)

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GWO2016 Call for Abstracts – Class and Gender 

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Following on from our successful ‘confreat’ in July we are pleased to announce that four delegates have successful developed a Gender, Work and Organization stream proposal for next year’s conference at Keele University. The stream called ‘Classed Experiences of Work’ was developed by confreat attendees Sally Jones, Sara Nadin, Robert Smith and Maria Villares as a result of discussions during the event. It was developed in collaboration with Caroline Essers (Radboud University, Netherlands) Huriye Aygören, (Jönköping University, Sweden), and Maja Cederberg, (Oxford Brookes University).

The aim of the stream is to place class at the centre of our understandings of gender and work. This follows an increasing awareness that inequalities related to class have been overlooked in the study of work, with other forms of social division such as gender and ethnicity gaining much more attention in recent decades. The stream views class as being central to all experiences of work, for both men and women whether in formal employment or self employed, and for people of all ethnicities.

We encourage GENSIG members to consider submitting an abstract proposal for the stream. All abstracts should be sent to Sally Jones by November 1st.

Download the full call here

GWO2016 Call for Abstracts – Feminist Perspectives on Entrepreneurship

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Gender, Work and Organisation
9th Biennial International Interdisciplinary conference

29th June-1st July, 2016
Keele University, UK

Entrepreneurship and feminist-theoretical perspectives

Stream Convenors:

  • Helene Ahl, Education & Communication, Jönköping University, SWEDEN
  • Karin Berglund, Business School, Stockholm University, SWEDEN
  • Susan Marlow, Business School, Nottingham University, ENGLAND
  • Katarina Pettersson, Social & Ec. Geography, University of Agricultural Sciences, SWEDEN
  • Malin Tillmar, Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SWEDEN

This stream calls for papers that respond to calls for research on entrepreneurship incorporating critical and feminist-theoretical perspectives affording attention to how entrepreneurship is shaped by a variety contexts. Research on women’s entrepreneurship now constitutes a mature field of study. A recent systematic literature review has identified over 600 academic articles on gender and women’s entrepreneurship (Jennings and Brush 2013). Critical analysts have found the field to be characterized by an Anglo-Saxon dominance, with a concentration on issues of ‘performance’ and ‘growth’ (Al Dajani and Marlow, 2010; Marlow, 2014). There is also a tendency to consider ‘gender’ as a variable (i.e. equivalent to sex) with explanatory power (Ahl 2006; Neergaard et al. 2011), instead of considering ‘gender’ as the relational and socially-constructed concept as originally defined (Ahl 2007). Most studies of women’s entrepreneurship are set in a male–female comparative frame, and explanations are sought for women’s “underperformance” (Marlow and McAdam 2012). However, this under-performance disappears when one controls for sector; men and women in businesses that are comparable in terms of business sector perform equally well (Robb and Watson 2012; Watson 2002). This particular area of research has been criticized for (i) inadvertently subordinating women through a normative assumption of entrepreneurship as being ‘male’, (ii) its individualist focus, (iii) its lack of attention to context and structure (Ahl 2006; Mirchandani 1999; Al Dajani and Marlow, 2010), and, not least, (iv) its neglect of how entrepreneurship is embedded in family (Jennings et al. 2013). Consequently, calls have been made for the study of women’s entrepreneurship in context (de Bruin et al. 2007; Brush et al. 2009; Welter 2011), as well as for the incorporation of critical, feminist-theoretical perspectives (Ahl and Marlow 2012; Bruni et al. 2004; Calás et al. 2009).

Entrepreneurship research often assumes gender equality to be merely an increase in economic participation or economic parity with men through business ownership (Gatewood et al. 2014). Feminist critiques suggest that entrepreneurship risks shaping women into exemplary neoliberal citizens who may no longer recognize, or even appreciate, structural remedies put in place by earlier, collective and political feminist activism (such as quotas, individual taxation or mandatory paternal leave). But it has also been suggested that entrepreneurship may be used as a vehicle for feminist action, where feminist resistance is put into practice through business. This is, in our view, a phenomenon in search of a name. We have coined the term FemInc.ism to denote this phenomenon (Ahl et al., 2014). It can be seen as a special case of the reformulation of entrepreneurship as social change, thereby capturing the many entrepreneurial endeavors that are not businesses, or not just businesses (Steyaert and Hjorth 2006; Calás et al. 2009). A related concept is entrepreneurship as politicizing (Al-Dajani and Marlow 2014). We define FemInc.ism as ‘feminist activism through enterprise’. Through this term we acknowledge the changing conditions for feminist action, in tandem with neoliberal expectations to mobilize oneself through enterprise, but also how this transformation may enable institutional change in private, public, or non-profit sectors through enterprise that is individually or collectively made. So, FemInc.ism gives a name to how institutional change can be created through business. It points to the potential for women and men to use entrepreneurship to achieve feminist change, but the term also points to the risks of being trapped in a situation of feminist backlash that may arise because of structural dissolution. We formulate a number of challenges that researching FemInc.ism is faced with. We claim that research must acknowledge (i) the importance of addressing context, including the time dimension; (ii) the importance of avoiding an a priori position regarding entrepreneurship; (iii) the importance of being open to ambiguities in the interpretation of research results; and finally, (iv) the need to develop feminist theory as well as entrepreneurship theory to adequately describe and understand this phenomenon. Suggested themes that may be addressed are:

• Studies of gendered contextual opportunities or limitations for entrepreneurship

• Developments of feminist theory and entrepreneurship theory

• Studies of entrepreneurship used as a vehicle for feminist action (FemInc.ism)

• Studies of institutional change created through business (FemInc.ism)

• Studies of how feminist action through business (Feminc.ism) affects/transforms femininities and masculinities (and vice versa)

• Discussions of what kind of enterprising selves are shaped through feminist action through business (Feminc.ism)

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st November 2015 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with ‘work in progress’ papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to: Karin Berglund. Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, department, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract. *Note that no funding, fee waiver, travel or other bursaries are offered for attendance at GWO2016*.