theory

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BAM Gender in Management SIG

in collaboration with ISBE Gender and Enterprise Network

present

 

Think-Space for Gender Theory

University of Loughborough – London (Stratford) campus

27-28 April 2017

(starting 10.00Hrs on 27 April, finishing 15.30Hrs on 28 April)

https://www.bam.ac.uk/civicrm/event/info?id=3256

Social constructionism and constructivism have undoubtedly advanced our thinking about gender. Recently, however, researchers have asked if they can give a full account of gendering. Critical questions include:

  • If gender has nothing to do with the body, how do we honour and account for physiological capacities exclusive to people with female reproductive organs like pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause?
  • If the body is taboo due to an ontology that centres discourse, how do we talk about bodily implications of gender oppression like pain and violence and material inequalities?
  • If ‘women’ is a discursive category devised to oppress, how can we speak of women’s interests and solidarity?
  • How do we conceptualise and account for the experiences of transgender, agender, nonbinary people and cis women (assigned female at birth) without acknowledging the body as well as social processes?
  • If we are all produced by society’s discourses, how do we theorise women’s agency and a process of emancipation?

In this 2 day ‘Think Space’ combining seminar and workshop formats, the BAM Gender in Management SIG and ISBE’s Gender and Enterprise Network (GEN) encourage an inter-disciplinary audience, taking as their springboard a recent Special Issue in the Journal of Critical Realism on gender theory. We aim to:

  1. Introduce critical realism to gender researchers
  2. Support constructive debate about the value of critical realism in comparison to social constructionism/vism as an ontology for gender research
  3. Begin to work with critical realism to think about feminist methodologies/themes
  4. Explore the implications of applying critical realism to Bourdieu’s theory of practice

 

Speakers

  • Dr Angela Martinez Dy, Loughborough University London
  • Prof Julia Rouse, Manchester Metropolitan University
  • Prof John Kitching, Kingston University
  • Dr Michiel Van Ingen, London School of Economics
  • Dr Elina Meliou, Newcastle University London
  • Dr Helen Mussell, Cambridge University
  • Dr Dave Elder-Vass, Loughborough University

 

Event Fee

  • BAM/ISBE Member  – £100 (incl. dinner)/ £75  (excl. dinner)
  • Student BAM/ISBE Members– £80 (incl. dinner)/ £55 (excl. dinner)
  • Non- BAM/ISBE Member  – £155 (incl. dinner)/ 130 (excl. dinner)
  • Non- BAM/ISBE Student Member – £100 (incl. dinner)/ £75 (excl. dinner)
  • ECRs who would like to attend but cannot gain support from their institution should contact the workshop organizers. Contact details are included at the end of this message.

 

Additional Information

We are not offering a day rate as we would like to encourage full participation in the 2-day Think Space. Early Career Researchers who can provide evidence that they are unable to gain institutional support to attend are invited to contact BAM to discuss whether payment of the doctoral fee might be a possibility.

 

Registration

We encourage registration from a range of disciplines and plan to create a space where researchers can consider the implications of critical realism for working for their own research and within or across their disciplinary boundaries.

BAM Members: Log into your account and proceed with the registration for the event.

Non-BAM Members (including ISBE Members): Please follow the steps below:

  1. Create a Non-BAM Member Account at Stay Informed.
  2. Complete your registration by emailing Oana at omihut@bam.ac.ukor calling the BAM office on 020 7383 7770.

If you are not a BAM member and would like to join BAM or find out more about the benefits of being a BAM member, please go to https://www.bam.ac.uk/membership-benefits.

 

Benefits of Attendance

– Deepening your thinking about the ontology of gender and, in particular, exploring social constructionism/vism, new materialism and critical realism

– Considering how critical realism relates to social theories such as Bourdieu’s theory of practice and to feminist methodologies and themes

– Engage in-depth with a friendly, inter-disciplinary audience

 

Event location

Loughborough University London

Here East 3 Lesney Avenue The Broadcast Centre Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park London

E15 2G, UK

Thursday Evening Meal:

Busaba Eathai, Westfield Stratford City

 

Accommodation

Nearest hotels are Premier Inn Stratford City, Staybridge Suites Westfield or Holiday Inn Stratford City. There are also a number of other hotels on Stratford High Street (Travelodge, another Holiday Inn, and The Westbridge).

 

Travel Information

BY TUBE: Take the Central Line to Stratford and then walk through the shopping centre to the Waitrose side. You can take the BT Shuttle for free from outside Stratford International by waiting at the lay-by/taxi rank in front of the Premier Inn Stratford City. It comes every 5 mins or so. SEE MAP.

BY BUS: We are at the Here East stop on bus line 388.

BY RAIL: Take the Javelin high speed train from St Pancras 1 stop to Stratford International. This costs about £7 for an anytime round trip ticket

Contact and Registration

For more information about the event please contact:

Dr Angela Martinez Dy a.dy@lboro.ac.uk

Prof. Julia Rouse J.Rouse@mmu.ac.uk

For general information, please contact Oana Mihut at the BAM Office on +44(0)2073837770, or at omihut@bam.ac.uk

Click here to register: https://www.bam.ac.uk/civicrm/event/info?id=3256

 

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GWO2016 Call for Abstracts – Feminist Perspectives on Entrepreneurship

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Gender, Work and Organisation
9th Biennial International Interdisciplinary conference

29th June-1st July, 2016
Keele University, UK

Entrepreneurship and feminist-theoretical perspectives

Stream Convenors:

  • Helene Ahl, Education & Communication, Jönköping University, SWEDEN
  • Karin Berglund, Business School, Stockholm University, SWEDEN
  • Susan Marlow, Business School, Nottingham University, ENGLAND
  • Katarina Pettersson, Social & Ec. Geography, University of Agricultural Sciences, SWEDEN
  • Malin Tillmar, Management and Engineering, Linköping University, SWEDEN

This stream calls for papers that respond to calls for research on entrepreneurship incorporating critical and feminist-theoretical perspectives affording attention to how entrepreneurship is shaped by a variety contexts. Research on women’s entrepreneurship now constitutes a mature field of study. A recent systematic literature review has identified over 600 academic articles on gender and women’s entrepreneurship (Jennings and Brush 2013). Critical analysts have found the field to be characterized by an Anglo-Saxon dominance, with a concentration on issues of ‘performance’ and ‘growth’ (Al Dajani and Marlow, 2010; Marlow, 2014). There is also a tendency to consider ‘gender’ as a variable (i.e. equivalent to sex) with explanatory power (Ahl 2006; Neergaard et al. 2011), instead of considering ‘gender’ as the relational and socially-constructed concept as originally defined (Ahl 2007). Most studies of women’s entrepreneurship are set in a male–female comparative frame, and explanations are sought for women’s “underperformance” (Marlow and McAdam 2012). However, this under-performance disappears when one controls for sector; men and women in businesses that are comparable in terms of business sector perform equally well (Robb and Watson 2012; Watson 2002). This particular area of research has been criticized for (i) inadvertently subordinating women through a normative assumption of entrepreneurship as being ‘male’, (ii) its individualist focus, (iii) its lack of attention to context and structure (Ahl 2006; Mirchandani 1999; Al Dajani and Marlow, 2010), and, not least, (iv) its neglect of how entrepreneurship is embedded in family (Jennings et al. 2013). Consequently, calls have been made for the study of women’s entrepreneurship in context (de Bruin et al. 2007; Brush et al. 2009; Welter 2011), as well as for the incorporation of critical, feminist-theoretical perspectives (Ahl and Marlow 2012; Bruni et al. 2004; Calás et al. 2009).

Entrepreneurship research often assumes gender equality to be merely an increase in economic participation or economic parity with men through business ownership (Gatewood et al. 2014). Feminist critiques suggest that entrepreneurship risks shaping women into exemplary neoliberal citizens who may no longer recognize, or even appreciate, structural remedies put in place by earlier, collective and political feminist activism (such as quotas, individual taxation or mandatory paternal leave). But it has also been suggested that entrepreneurship may be used as a vehicle for feminist action, where feminist resistance is put into practice through business. This is, in our view, a phenomenon in search of a name. We have coined the term FemInc.ism to denote this phenomenon (Ahl et al., 2014). It can be seen as a special case of the reformulation of entrepreneurship as social change, thereby capturing the many entrepreneurial endeavors that are not businesses, or not just businesses (Steyaert and Hjorth 2006; Calás et al. 2009). A related concept is entrepreneurship as politicizing (Al-Dajani and Marlow 2014). We define FemInc.ism as ‘feminist activism through enterprise’. Through this term we acknowledge the changing conditions for feminist action, in tandem with neoliberal expectations to mobilize oneself through enterprise, but also how this transformation may enable institutional change in private, public, or non-profit sectors through enterprise that is individually or collectively made. So, FemInc.ism gives a name to how institutional change can be created through business. It points to the potential for women and men to use entrepreneurship to achieve feminist change, but the term also points to the risks of being trapped in a situation of feminist backlash that may arise because of structural dissolution. We formulate a number of challenges that researching FemInc.ism is faced with. We claim that research must acknowledge (i) the importance of addressing context, including the time dimension; (ii) the importance of avoiding an a priori position regarding entrepreneurship; (iii) the importance of being open to ambiguities in the interpretation of research results; and finally, (iv) the need to develop feminist theory as well as entrepreneurship theory to adequately describe and understand this phenomenon. Suggested themes that may be addressed are:

• Studies of gendered contextual opportunities or limitations for entrepreneurship

• Developments of feminist theory and entrepreneurship theory

• Studies of entrepreneurship used as a vehicle for feminist action (FemInc.ism)

• Studies of institutional change created through business (FemInc.ism)

• Studies of how feminist action through business (Feminc.ism) affects/transforms femininities and masculinities (and vice versa)

• Discussions of what kind of enterprising selves are shaped through feminist action through business (Feminc.ism)

Abstracts of approximately 500 words (ONE page, Word document NOT PDF, single spaced, excluding references, no header, footers or track changes) are invited by 1st November 2015 with decisions on acceptance to be made by stream leaders within one month. All abstracts will be peer reviewed. New and young scholars with ‘work in progress’ papers are welcomed. In the case of co-authored papers, ONE person should be identified as the corresponding author. Note that due to restrictions of space, multiple submissions by the same author will not be timetabled. In the first instance, abstracts should be emailed to: Karin Berglund. Abstracts should include FULL contact details, including your name, department, institutional affiliation, mailing address, and e-mail address. State the title of the stream to which you are submitting your abstract. *Note that no funding, fee waiver, travel or other bursaries are offered for attendance at GWO2016*.

Call for Papers: Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism

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Reposted from: http://www.maneyonline.com/pb/assets/raw/PRT/REA_special_issue_gender.pdf

Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism: Special Issue of the Journal of Critical Realism (15:5, 2016)

Edited by Angela Martínez Dy, Lena Gunnarsson and Michiel van Ingen

Email Enquiries to: lena.gunnarsson at oru.se

Submit online at: http://www.editorialmanager.com/rea/

An increasing number of gender scholars have become familiar with critical realism, finding it a robust alternative to the poststructuralist perspectives that currently dominate gender studies and feminism. This trend has coincided with an increased interest among feminist theorists in the issues of ontology, materiality and nature, which have always been at the heart of critical realist interventions. However, despite these thematic alignments, and despite the fact that both critical realism and feminist theory are inherently critical-emancipatory, the critical realist approach continues to occupy a marginal role within both feminist and gender studies debates. Concurrently, the field of critical realism is decidedly ‘masculine’ in nature, both in the sense that men dominate the field, and in terms of the issues with which critical realists have most commonly concerned themselves. Recent critical realist feminist work, the International Association of Critical Realism’s adoption of a proactive policy to enhance the representation of women in its organs and activities, and the growing critical realist preoccupation (particularly in Bhaskar’s philosophy of metaReality) with historically ‘feminine’ topics such as love, mark a potential shift away from these unfortunate trends.

In order to encourage the development of this emerging field of critical realist feminism and gender studies, as well as critical exchanges between the respective branches of critical realism (including dialectical critical realism and metaRealism) and feminist theory/gender studies, we are happy to invite submissions for a special issue of Journal of Critical Realism on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism. We welcome not only contributions that draw on critical realism in studying gender relations and/or engaging with feminist concerns but also critiques of critical realism from feminist or gender-based points of view.

Topics of interest include, but are by no means limited to, the following:

  • Critical realism and poststructuralist feminism/gender studies
  • Critical realism and socialist/eco/radical/black/postcolonial feminism
  • Critical realism and the ontological/materialist/naturalistic turn in feminist theory
  • Critical realism and intersectionality
  • Critical realism, metaRealism, love and gender
  • Critiques/auto-critiques of existing critical realist work from a feminist/gender studies perspective
  • Feminist epistemology, standpoint theory and critical realism
  • Critical realism and feminist critiques of (social) science
  • Examinations/critiques of feminist taboos on realism, nature and causality
  • Critical realism and post-feminist culture
  • Critical realism, dialectics and feminist deconstruction
  • Revitalizing the explanatory feminist tradition: what is patriarchy?
  • Critical realism and sexuality
  • Critical realism and queer studies
  • Critical realism and men/masculinity studies
  • Critical realism, sex and gender identity
  • Critical realism and gendered/sexual violence
  • Critical realism, feminism, gender studies and war/conflict
  • Critical realism and feminist ethics
  • Critical realism and pornography
  • Critical realism and feminist methods/methodology
  • Agency, gender and critical realism
  • Critical realism and feminist activism/politics
  • Feminism, gender studies, critical realism and other realisms (Barad’s agential realism, post-positivist realism etc.)
  • Critical realism as underlabourer for applied work in feminism/gender studies
  • Critical realism, interdisciplinarity, gender and feminism
  • Feminist spirituality and metaRealism
  • Critical realism and feminist economics

Instructions for authors

Papers should be no more than 8,000 words (not inclusive of references). In all other respects, our instructions for authors apply. Please consult these at www.maneyonline.com/ifa/rea or use one of our recently published articles as a guide in setting out your work. Articles (as distinct from pieces for our Perspective and Debate sections) will be subject to external peer review.

Submissions need not be exclusively concerned with critical realism or its critique, but should relate their arguments in some significant way to critical realism. For instance, the main focus of an article could be Karen Barad’s feminist appropriation of Bohr’s agential realism, but it should include consideration of critical realism.

Important dates

  • October 1, 2015: deadline for first drafts
  • February 26, 2016: reviewers’ reports and editors’ decision provided
  • May 23, 2016: deadline for final drafts
  • June 30, 2016: final copy due with the publisher
  • October 2016: publication of the special issue online and print

Enquiries and submissions

Please send any enquiries to lena.gunnarsson at oru.se Please upload articles for peer review to our online system, http://www.editorialmanager.com/rea/default.asp. When uploading you will be asked if your paper is for a themed issue. Please answer ‘Yes, the special issue on Critical Realism, Gender and Feminism’. If your paper is accepted but not included in the special issue, it will appear in a subsequent issue. Please send any other material for the special issue to lena.gunnarsson at oru.se.

About the Journal

Journal of Critical Realism is the journal of the International Association for Critical Realism (IACR), established in 1997 to foster the discussion, propagation and development of critical realist approaches to understanding and changing the world. It provides a forum for scholars wishing to promote realist emancipatory philosophy, social theory and science on an interdisciplinary and international basis, and for those who wish to engage with such an approach.