‘Stay Home’ and Work? Implications of COVID-19 and the UK Governmental Response for Self-Employed Women

Posted on Updated on

The Gender and Enterprise Collective* (Haya Al-Dajani, Angela M. Dy, Carol Ekinsmyth, Sally Jones, Lorna Treanor, Julia Rouse, Natalia Vershinina)

Given last week’s government announcement of the stimulus bill meant to mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 crisis on the UK economy, it is important to recognise the implications for women broadly, and self-employed women more specifically. Such bills are notoriously gender blind, thus discounting the impact on the extent to which self-employed women are at most risk from the CV pandemic crisis. Further, self-employment is far from homogenous, so a blanket approach to support is insufficient. The self-employed contribute around a third of UK employment growth in the past decade; women-driven part-time self-employment has comprised most of this increase. Statistically, 34% of UK business owners are women; of these, 33% are sole-traders, 40% are in partnership businesses and 28% company-owners. There were 5.8 million registered small businesses in the UK in 2019, and 5 million self-employed, comprising more than 15% of the workforce. 

Micro-enterprises, or businesses with less than 15 employees, are the largest group within the small and medium enterprise (SME) category; of these, sole traders tend to earn particularly low incomes. In 2015/16 their annual income was £21,000, almost £10,000 less than the average employee income. There has also been a decrease in sole-trader profit since 2008 generally, but notably, a 2% decrease in profit for 2015-16 despite an increase in the numbers of self-employed. We can conclude from this that people are therefore remaining in low income self-employment, with reports of individuals being trapped in poverty as a result.    

Although men are more likely to be self-employed or own businesses than women, we argue that self-employed women comprise the most at-risk group during this crisis. Women’s self-employment tends to mirror the patterns of their employment: service-based lifestyle businesses, mostly in crowded, lower-margin feminised sectors such as personal services, caring, health, community, education and edutainment, and social activities, that have grown with the rise of the gig economy. The majority of these operate in the small to micro category of brick-and-mortar or interpersonal businesses that have been forced to close. On average, women start their businesses with 53% less capital than men, tend to draw more upon private capital and family finances, are more likely than men’s to be small, and turn over less income annually. While we hold that these patterns of disparity are not the fault of individual women, but rather due to structural factors, the overall picture is that in an economic downturn, it is women who are most likely to be disproportionately negatively affected. 

In addition, there exists a mostly invisible, feminised economic system run ‘by women for women’: a business support system of women providing caring and domestic services that enable self-employed women, of all backgrounds, to manage their businesses. This feminised domestic support is often provided by a ‘care chain’ of immigrants and/or women of colour, whose physically embodied labour makes possible the knowledge work powering the digital economy, but is impossible to translate into the digital space as required by the conditions of the COVID-19 home confinement.

The home is a gendered space where traditional gender roles and relations have proved persistent. Most women in heterosexual relationships are responsible for the bulk of domestic labour and child and elder care duties. Gender affects every sphere of home life, including physical space allocation, emotional support to family members, and the ‘mental load’ of planning, scheduling and food shopping. When homeworking, men typically are designated the home office, while women are more likely to work on the sofa or at the kitchen table where they are more accessible to family members; due to men’s work being prioritised, women are more likely to be disturbed while men are ‘left alone’ to complete their work. Lastly, in a time of emergency, when illness is spreading and schools are closed, it is women who are most likely homeschooling children, checking on people within intergenerational family and friend networks, as well as engaging in newly established mutual aid groups. Those interested in the welfare of self-employed women must therefore ask: in this setting, what is the scope for women to keep businesses running alongside extra domestic demands? Even if their businesses do enable working from home, how will the confinement impact their incomes, and how might they benefit – or not – from the governmental support on offer? 

We recognise that many small business owners and self-employed individuals and freelancers will be relieved at Chancellor Rishi Sunak’s announcement on Thursday 26th March of a support package for UK entrepreneurs. This is said to capture 95% of the self-employed population, but there is a lack of clarity surrounding those individuals and their enterprises who are eligible for this support. The necessity to minimise fraudulent claims is understandable; however, many enterprising individuals who have recently started their own business (and have not submitted a self-assessment tax return) or whose firms are just gaining traction, but have not yet generated a profit, will not be supported. This has implications for the future pipeline of enterprising small firms in the UK, as 40% of UK registered businesses are less than 3 years old and most businesses take 2-3 years to turn a profit. In relation to women’s enterprise, it is likely that most women entrepreneurs will qualify for the support outlined, as their businesses have closed or are operating at a reduced capacity. While self-employed people of all genders will be eligible for a taxed grant of 80% of their average profits, up to a maximum of £2,500, for many women in particular, given low profits over the preceding period, access to Universal Credit may in fact be more beneficial than the proposed support.

In addition, as women-owned businesses typically generate lower profits, we expect the crisis to increase financial dependence upon partners or, in the case of single self-employed women or parents, cause substantial difficulties in providing for themselves or their families. As a result, they may be expected to consider debt finance to make it to the June 2020 assistance-receipt deadline given that they are less likely to have significant savings. Yet evidence shows that women self-employed/business owners are, reasonably, more reluctant to take on financial risk, such that the Business Interruption Loan Scheme might be less attractive or accessible to women.

Women’s ability to accrue financial resources and savings is typically restricted; as employees, this is due to gendered pay-differentials; as entrepreneurs, this is informed by the lower-margin sectors in which most women’s businesses are located, leading to a 43% gender pay gap among the self-employed. Maternity leave is one period where women’s earning power is significantly reduced: if a self-employed woman has had maternity leave over the past three years, this would have a significant impact upon their accrued and average profits over the assessed period under this support package. Even where some women can continue their service-based, income generating business activities online, anecdotal evidence shows that during the COVID19 ‘homestay’ they are doing so either at reduced rates or as a free community service. 

We have recently published a series of State of the Art Reviews on ‘What Next For UK Women’s Enterprise Policy’. Drawing upon our expertise, in light of yesterday’s announcement, we posit a number of outstanding questions regarding the extent of support provided by this package, especially for women entrepreneurs, including: 

  1. As women have been driving the growth in self-employment, is it possible that they will constitute the majority of nascent business owners (under 3 years old), who may not be entitled to any support?
  2. Will access to Business Interruption Loans be readily forthcoming for women entrepreneurs owning low-profit businesses? Will business owners be asked to put their houses on the line for collateral, or provide personal guarantors?    
  3. What is the impact upon those within the ‘Most Vulnerable’ category such as  pregnant and disabled individuals, and those with underlying health conditions for whom 12 weeks of self-isolation is mandatory? 
  4. How will those who have not been explicitly addressed in the UK Government Financial Aid Package be affected, such as entrepreneurial refugees, asylum seekers and other migrant women who have no access to government funds?
  5. What might the implications be, now and in the future, for women’s informal economic and entrepreneurial activity? 

As we are ‘all in this together’, provision should extend to 100% of the self-employed. Prior to the crisis, self-employment was the only growth category in the UK labour market. Thus, how we support self-employed people and nascent businesses now will determine the direction of the UK economy for decades to come.

* The GEN Collective are the Organising Committee of the Gender and Enterprise Network (ISBEGEN) an Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (ISBE) Special Issue Group.

GEN Spotlight on Intersectionality: 2019 Webinar and ThinkSpace

Posted on Updated on

GEN members and associates are focusing this year on developing and sharing knowledge within our learning communities on the black feminist topic of intersectionality.

To this end, we will be hosting a webinar on 10 May followed by a 2-day ‘ThinkSpace’ event at Newcastle University on 15-16 May. Details are as follows.

WEBINAR: Friday, 10th May, 12-1pm (GMT)

ISBE’s Gender and Enterprise Network (GEN) Special Interest Group is pleased to present this webinar on Intersectionality Theory. Introduced by Dr Natalia Vershinina, our three expert speakers will guide delegates through the theory of intersectionality and its practical implications for organisations, entrepreneurship and well-being. The webinar is presented in partnership with ECSB, the European Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship.

Speakers:

Dr Angela Martinez Dy,Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Loughborough University London – Introduction to intersectionality theory

Dr Jenny K Rodriguez,Senior Lecturer in Employment Studies, The University of Manchester – Intersectionality in the study of organisations

Jennifer Agwunobi,Loughborough University London – Relationships between intersectionality, entrepreneurship and well-being

ECSB/ISBE webinars are open to both ECSB and ISBE members. To become an ECSB member and join the ECSB community visit http://www.ecsb.org/shop/ .To join ISBE visit https://isbe.org.uk/about-us/how-to-join/

https://isbe.org.uk/gen-webinar-may19/  link to register for the Webinar

Please feel free to forward this email to everyone within your institutions or within your professional network. We encourage you to hold Webinar parties and look forward to your attendance, questions and contributions!

THINKSPACE: 15-16 May 2019

ISBE’s Gender and Enterprise Network (GEN) Special Interest Group is pleased to offer a Think Space on Intersectionality hosted by Newcastle University Business School.

Building on the Intersectionality webinar on 10th May, the Think Space will:
• Explore the origins of intersectionality
• Share recent intersectional research inside and outside of the entrepreneurship field
• Provide a space for delegates to identify and surface intersectionality within their own research
• Explore the practical implications for conducting intersectional research and its importance to entrepreneurship.

Speakers:

Prof Laura Galloway, Professor of Business & Enterprise, Edinburgh Business School, Heriot-Watt University
“Poverty and enterprise: revisiting social class through the lens of intersectionality”.

Prof Peter Hopkins, Professor of Social Geography and University Dean of Social Justice, School of Geography Politics and Sociology, Newcastle University
‘Intersectionality and place: race, migration and the body’

Dr Angela Martinez Dy, Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Loughborough University London

Dr Jenny K Rodriguez, Senior Lecturer in Employment Studies, The University of Manchester

Further speakers to be confirmed

Posters 

Doctoral students and Early Career Researchers are invited to submit a poster presentation based on their developing intersectional work. There will be opportunity for informal discussion and feedback during the ‘Think Space’. Please email your posters to info@isbe.org.uk by 6th May 2019.

Cost

The cost of the event includes attendance for both days including hospitality for both days (lunch and refreshments) and an evening meal on Wednesday 15th May.

• Doctoral Students £65
• Early Career Researchers £85
• ISBE Members £100
• Non ISBE Members £120

Registration

To register for the Think Space, please visit here.

NB: Accommodation, breakfast and additional drinks at the dinner are at delegates own expense. If you would like assistance sourcing accommodation please visit https://www.newcastlegateshead.com/accommodation

GEN Confreat attendees win Best Paper Awards at the Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship Conference

Posted on Updated on

Angela ISBE.jpg-large
Dr Angela Carradus receiving award for  Best Paper in Family Business track

Congratulations to GEN members and Confreat attendees, Dr Angela Carradus, Nermin Elkafrawi and Annie Roos, who won best paper awards at last week’s ISBE conference in Birmingham.

Angela’s paper, titled ‘Creating a Copreneurial drama: Looking through a dramaturgical lens to interpret copreneurial start-up’, won best paper in the Family Business conference track.

Nermin and Annie’s paper, written with colleagues from the University of Huddersfield,  won the Best Early Career Research paper. Their paper was titled ‘Strong structuration theory: A way to further conceptualize entrepreneurship research’.

All three attended this year’s GEN confreat in Denmark, organised by Professor Helle Neegaard and developed these winning papers while they were there.

We are really pleased that they have been recognised and to have played some part in their success.

Screen Shot 2018-11-14 at 15.02.54
Nermin Elkafrawi receiving award for Best Early Career Researcher Paper